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Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Tessa's test results

I met with the psychologist today to discuss Tessa's test results. I had a serious case of deju vu on the way down there because we found out Jenna had Trisomy 18 on a Wednesday. I heard some songs on the radio that made me cry, so on the way to Murfreesboro, I cried and got it out of my system. I didn't want the psychologist to think I was a dork or anything.

We first went over her IQ testing. She scored a 100, which is average. IQ falls on a Bell curve (so funny that I just studied this last semester in statistics and cognitive psychology), and anything between 90 and 110 is considered "average" or "normal."

The testing scored her IQ and then went on to test her ability. After this, the two were compared for any discrepancies. On the ability testing, she did well in her working memory, math skills and verbal comprehension. She actually scored above average on her math skills. She lagged behind with almost all of the reading.

One of the biggest discrepancies came with processing information. The way they tested this was at the top of a piece of paper was a bunch of shapes. Inside the shapes was a symbol. Below that, empty shapes filled the page, and Tessa had to fill in as many as she could with the correct symbol. Her doctor said most kids finished the entire page in the allotted time. Tessa was only able to do three lines.

In order to say she has a learning disability (dyslexia), the discrepancy would have to be at least 16 points. Tessa's was 14. The psychologist feels she does have a learning disability, but he can't diagnose it at this time because of the scores.

He did diagnose her with ADHD -- ADHD-Nos to be exact. This means ADHD-non-specified. She got that diagnosis because she isn't hyperactive and impulsive but is instead inattentive and impulsive. He recommended medication, and we go tomorrow to her pediatrician (a new one because her former one told me Tessa was just yanking my chain when we went to see her back in February) for a prescription.

He recommended we not hold her back in first grade. He said if it was him, he would allow her to go to second grade, put her in a Resource or Title 1 reading class and get her an afternoon tutor. At the end of the school year, we would test her again, either through the school system or through him. I have a call into the school now, and I plan to push to have her moved to second grade. I will tell the principal it is what the psychologist recommended.

So, now I have a bit of a plan, and after tomorrow, we will have a partial strategy for coping with the ADHD. I don't want to do meds that are going to make her sleepy and a zombie, but I want one that will actually help her. Let's hope we can find it right away.

2 comments:

Sofia said...

I remember when my kids were diagnosed with ASD like it was yesterday. My daughter was diagnosed with PDD-NOS, my son with Asperger's Syndrome. The prognosis was not good for her. But we didnt listen. They wanted him on meds, but we refused.

We chose our own path for them and I don't regret it at all. I am actually really proud of that. Its been 10 years now. They are so far from what the professionals told us that I wish sometimes I could bring them back to those doctors and show them just how well the kids are actually doing.

If you don't want to put your daughter on meds, I completely understand why. I don't think many parents would choose that as a first course of treatment. What else are you looking into?

While our kids have a different diagnosis than yours, I have found that many of the alternatives address ASD and ADHD quite the same. We started with nutrition and saw dramatic differences within the first few weeks!!!

If there is anything I can do, please don't hesitate.
Sofia

JenJen said...

I know the diagnosis wasn't something you wanted but with answers comes solutions! I know you'll do whatever Tessa needs to help her overcome her adhd behaviors...my neice as the same type of adhd and has been on medication in the past...you can definitely tell when she's on meds and when she isn't! It's a world of difference!

Good luck!